1. DHS Infrastructure Sector Resilience Report: Electric Power Delivery →

    KEY FINDINGS

    Of the 3,352 sites across all 16 sectors that received DHS assessments (2009–2012), 90 percent depend on electric power for core operations.

    Critical dependencies and interdependencies of the Energy Sector mean that the loss of electric power can quickly cascade to other lifeline infrastructure systems (including Water, Wastewater, Communications, Transportation, and Information Technology (IT)), potentially degrading services necessary for public health and safety.

    Of the 41 electric power substations assessed by DHS, 59 percent depend upon an external source of electric power for on-site operations, 62 percent depend on communications, and 77 percent depend on IT to maintain operations.

    Interruption to IT supporting infrastructures, including the loss of electric power, could limit the operating flexibility and efficiency of electric substations and system monitoring equipment. A large-scale IT disruption could potentially impact power delivery to other critical infrastructure assets in the electric service area.

  2. The good news is that 100 years later the world is a far more stable and peaceful place. (via 100 Years Ago Today It Began: “Austria Has Chosen War” | Zero Hedge)

    The good news is that 100 years later the world is a far more stable and peaceful place. (via 100 Years Ago Today It Began: “Austria Has Chosen War” | Zero Hedge)

  3. explore-blog:

George Bernard Shaw, born on this day in 1856, on marriage, the oppression of women, and the hypocrisy of monogamy 

    explore-blog:

    George Bernard Shaw, born on this day in 1856, on marriage, the oppression of women, and the hypocrisy of monogamy 

  4. It seems to me quite reasonable to think that the death of the fly is entirely insignificant and that it is at the same time a kind of catastrophe. To entertain such contradictions is always uncomfortable, but in this case the dissonance echoes far and wide, bouncing off countless other decisions about what to buy, what to eat – what to kill; highlighting the inconsistencies in our philosophies, our attempts to make sense of our place in the world and our relations to our co‑inhabitants on Earth. The reality is that we do not know what to think about death: not that of a fly, or of a dog or a pig, or of ourselves.

    […]

    That tadpoles are fodder for pond-life is as natural as the leaves falling on the water in autumn; that flies get squidged is as ordinary as apples rotting in the orchard. One’s own death, on the other hand, seems most unnatural. It seems rather an error and an outrage; a cosmic crime; a reason to raise one’s fist and rebel against the regime that ordered this slaughter of innocents… But here we are – guests at the party of life and death. We know we must exit along with the flies and the tadpoles. But we would rather not think about it.

    […]

    We cannot do away with death without doing away with life.

    — 

    Philosopher Stephen Cave, author of Immortality: The Quest to Live Forever and How It Drives Civilization, echoes Alan Watts in a beautiful essay on death in Aeon Magazine.

    Or, as C.S. Lewis put it“Try to exclude the possibility of suffering which the order of nature and the existence of free wills involve, and you find that you have excluded life itself.”

    (via explore-blog)

  5. archivesofamericanart:

Color, meet Wheel. I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.
Color wheel, 19—? Rudolph Schaeffer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    archivesofamericanart:

    Color, meet Wheel. I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

    Color wheel, 19—? Rudolph Schaeffer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

  6. The most interesting (to date) application of 3D printing I have seen.  (Any more miniatures of the Eiffel Tower and my head will surely explode.)
scienceyoucanlove:

In China, world’s first successful 3D-printed shoulder and collar bone implants have been performed In Xi’an, China, the capital of Shaanxi province, 3D-printed titanium prostheses were successfully implanted into three patients suffering from cancerous bone tumors. The procedures took place on March 27 and April 3 this year and the patients are currently in good condition and recovering with their new, 3D-printed bone replacements: a collar bone, a shoulder bone, and the right ilium of the pelvis.One of the three patients, a 20-year-old woman, was diagnosed a year ago with Ewing’s sarcoma in her right collar bone. Ewing’s sarcoma is a type of small, round, blue-celled tumor. The second patient also suffered from this disease in her right scapula or shoulder bone.And the third patient was diagnosed with cancer in the right ilium of the pelvis. These patients all had malignant tumors which could be life threatening if not removed. Eventually, the hospital decided that operations were needed to remove the tumors and replace the affected bones. This is where 3D printing technology comes in.A clavicle or collarbone replacement is a difficult procedure because of the complexity of the bone. With 3D-printing technology, it was possible to avoid some complications involved in the traditional procedure. Computer imaging was used to design a collarbone in the exact size and shape of the patient’s original bone. The 3D bone design was printed using laser sintering technology which fused titanium powder into the exact shape of the bone. This process produces a strong, customized titanium implant which ensures the implant fits well in the patient’s body. Infections and loosening and can be prevented in this way and lead to better health and functionality for the patient.Full article:http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140603-in-china-world-first-successful-3d-printed-shoulder-and-collar-bone-implants.html
source 

    The most interesting (to date) application of 3D printing I have seen.  (Any more miniatures of the Eiffel Tower and my head will surely explode.)

    scienceyoucanlove:

    In China, world’s first successful 3D-printed shoulder and collar bone implants have been performed 

    In Xi’an, China, the capital of Shaanxi province, 3D-printed titanium prostheses were successfully implanted into three patients suffering from cancerous bone tumors. The procedures took place on March 27 and April 3 this year and the patients are currently in good condition and recovering with their new, 3D-printed bone replacements: a collar bone, a shoulder bone, and the right ilium of the pelvis.

    One of the three patients, a 20-year-old woman, was diagnosed a year ago with Ewing’s sarcoma in her right collar bone. Ewing’s sarcoma is a type of small, round, blue-celled tumor. The second patient also suffered from this disease in her right scapula or shoulder bone.

    And the third patient was diagnosed with cancer in the right ilium of the pelvis. These patients all had malignant tumors which could be life threatening if not removed. Eventually, the hospital decided that operations were needed to remove the tumors and replace the affected bones. This is where 3D printing technology comes in.

    A clavicle or collarbone replacement is a difficult procedure because of the complexity of the bone. With 3D-printing technology, it was possible to avoid some complications involved in the traditional procedure. 

    Computer imaging was used to design a collarbone in the exact size and shape of the patient’s original bone. The 3D bone design was printed using laser sintering technology which fused titanium powder into the exact shape of the bone. This process produces a strong, customized titanium implant which ensures the implant fits well in the patient’s body. Infections and loosening and can be prevented in this way and lead to better health and functionality for the patient.

    Full article:
    http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140603-in-china-world-first-successful-3d-printed-shoulder-and-collar-bone-implants.html

    source 

  7. 9-Volt Nirvana  →

    tDCS validation makes me now reconsider all those folks with tin-foil hats…

    In the last couple years, tDCS has been all over the news. Researchers claim that juicing the brain with just 2 milliamps (think 9-volt battery) can help with everything from learning languages, to quitting smoking, to overcoming depression.

  8. Cloudera, MapR, IBM, and Intel bet on Spark as the new heart of Hadoop →

    cloudofdata:

    Interesting… Whither Impala?

  9. Throughout human history, plotting populations by age group has yielded a pyramid. Across societies, the young (the base) exceeded the old (the tip). 
But in recent decades, these pyramids have been morphing into rectangles and other previously unseen shapes. Just look at how the age breakdown of the U.S. population is expected to change between 1950 and 2060, in the GIF below. As early as 2030, the percentage of Americans 65 and older could surpass the percentage that is younger than 15. "This is uncharted water," according to Paul Taylor, who researches demographic and generational changes at the Pew Research Center.
 (via The End of the Age Pyramid - Uri Friedman - The Atlantic)

    Throughout human history, plotting populations by age group has yielded a pyramid. Across societies, the young (the base) exceeded the old (the tip).

    But in recent decades, these pyramids have been morphing into rectangles and other previously unseen shapes. Just look at how the age breakdown of the U.S. population is expected to change between 1950 and 2060, in the GIF below. As early as 2030, the percentage of Americans 65 and older could surpass the percentage that is younger than 15.

    "This is uncharted water," according to Paul Taylor, who researches demographic and generational changes at the Pew Research Center. (via The End of the Age Pyramid - Uri Friedman - The Atlantic)

  10. You can’t argue with these numbers! (via Why You Are Wrong)
Wonderful. I just wish I had the presence of mind and quickness to pull some of these out for use in my everyday life. …Of course, I’d probably be severely scarred by now.

    You can’t argue with these numbers! (via Why You Are Wrong)

    Wonderful. I just wish I had the presence of mind and quickness to pull some of these out for use in my everyday life. …Of course, I’d probably be severely scarred by now.