1. warrenellis:

http://www.doctorwhisky.com/coffee-is-my-operating-system-mug/

'Nuff said.

    warrenellis:

    http://www.doctorwhisky.com/coffee-is-my-operating-system-mug/

    'Nuff said.

  2. World: Why are you attacking Ukraine?
    Putin: Wha... Oh, no those soldiers are just on vacation. Yes, vacation.

  3. stoweboyd:

datarep:

Money raised from popular fundraisers and the number of related disease deaths.
Read More

Proof of human stupidity #457

    stoweboyd:

    datarep:

    Money raised from popular fundraisers and the number of related disease deaths.

    Read More

    Proof of human stupidity #457

  4. brucesterling:

*There’s something to this, but if you take the trouble to hang out with actual futurists you’ll see that they don’t really do much of this…  On the contrary, they’d glance at that image on the bottom and go “Oh yeah, that’s the classic Detroit Rust Belt model.  That scenario was big during the 1970s Energy Crisis.”

The 40 highest authority Twitter profiles in the network are:
@iftf – Institute for the Future@WorldFutureSoc – World Future Society@rossdawson – Ross Dawson@gleonhard – Gerd Leonhard@DefTechPat – Patrick Tucker@Urbanverse – Cindy Frewen@VenessaMiemis – Venessa Miemis@cshirky – Clay Shirky@cascio – Jamais Cascio@bruces – Bruce Sterling@mitchbetts – Mitch Betts@frankspencer – Frank Spencer@futuryst – Stuart Candy@johnmsmart – John Smart@Geofutures – Josh Calder@ThomasFrey – Thomas Frey@doctorow – Cory Doctorow@heathervescent – Heather Schlegel@psaffo – Paul Saffo@MareeConway – Maree Conway@dunagan23 – Jake Dunagan@jenjarratt – Jennifer Jarratt@kevin2kelly – Kevin Kelly@wendyinfutures – Wendy L Schultz@patrickdixon – Patrick Dixon@Joi – Joi Ito@GreatDismal – William Gibson@futuristpaul – Paul Higgins@futuramb – P A Martin Börjesson@kristinalford – Kristin Alford@nraford – Noah Raford@avantgame – Jane McGonigal@DavidBrin – David Brin@jhagel – John Hagel@fastfuture – Rohit Talwar@singularityhub – Singularity Hub@singularityu – SingularityU@futureguru – Dr. James Canton@timeguide – Ian Pearson@FutureCon – Future Conscience
Read more: http://rossdawson.com/articles/futurists-twitter-analysis-network-centrality/#ixzz3BrJtP4IX

    brucesterling:

    *There’s something to this, but if you take the trouble to hang out with actual futurists you’ll see that they don’t really do much of this…  On the contrary, they’d glance at that image on the bottom and go “Oh yeah, that’s the classic Detroit Rust Belt model.  That scenario was big during the 1970s Energy Crisis.”

    The 40 highest authority Twitter profiles in the network are:

    @iftf – Institute for the Future
    @WorldFutureSoc – World Future Society
    @rossdawson – Ross Dawson
    @gleonhard – Gerd Leonhard
    @DefTechPat – Patrick Tucker
    @Urbanverse – Cindy Frewen
    @VenessaMiemis – Venessa Miemis
    @cshirky – Clay Shirky
    @cascio – Jamais Cascio
    @bruces – Bruce Sterling
    @mitchbetts – Mitch Betts
    @frankspencer – Frank Spencer
    @futuryst – Stuart Candy
    @johnmsmart – John Smart
    @Geofutures – Josh Calder
    @ThomasFrey – Thomas Frey
    @doctorow – Cory Doctorow
    @heathervescent – Heather Schlegel
    @psaffo – Paul Saffo
    @MareeConway – Maree Conway
    @dunagan23 – Jake Dunagan
    @jenjarratt – Jennifer Jarratt
    @kevin2kelly – Kevin Kelly
    @wendyinfutures – Wendy L Schultz
    @patrickdixon – Patrick Dixon
    @Joi – Joi Ito
    @GreatDismal – William Gibson
    @futuristpaul – Paul Higgins
    @futuramb – P A Martin Börjesson
    @kristinalford – Kristin Alford
    @nraford – Noah Raford
    @avantgame – Jane McGonigal
    @DavidBrin – David Brin
    @jhagel – John Hagel
    @fastfuture – Rohit Talwar
    @singularityhub – Singularity Hub
    @singularityu – SingularityU
    @futureguru – Dr. James Canton
    @timeguide – Ian Pearson
    @FutureCon – Future Conscience



    Read more: http://rossdawson.com/articles/futurists-twitter-analysis-network-centrality/#ixzz3BrJtP4IX

  5. Can the Nervous System Be Hacked? →

    This is essentially a ‘deep signal inspection’ problem, for which solutions need to include a good way to instrument the ‘network’ (a person’s nervous systems) and then do analytics / signal analysis on the captured data… not unlike signal intelligence. OK. I’m in.

    The vagus nerve and its branches conduct nerve impulses — called action potentials — to every major organ. But communication between nerves and the immune system was considered impossible, according to the scientific consensus in 1998. Textbooks from the era taught, he said, “that the immune system was just cells floating around. Nerves don’t float anywhere. Nerves are fixed in tissues.” It would have been “inconceivable,” he added, to propose that nerves were directly interacting with immune cells.

    ‘There was nothing in the scientific thinking that said electricity would do anything. It was anathema to logic. Nobody thought it would work.’

    Nonetheless, Tracey was certain that an interface existed, and that his rat would prove it.

    Whereas drug discovery primarily involves like-minded thinkers — molecular biologists, chemists, geneticists — bioelectronics calls for alliances between experts in fields that in many cases have little to do with medicine — nanotech, optics, electrical engineering, materials science, computer programming, wireless networking and data mining.

  6. Monk: The High Priest of Jazz →

    Among all the jazz musicians of his generation, none was reported “further out” than Monk. Tales of his strangeness drifted through the stale and noisy air of every jazz joint. The hipsters, taking his name for an obscure joke, called him “The Mad Monk” or “The High Priest of Bop.” They made much of his clumsy dances, his fondness for silly hats, hit gift for cryptic and whimsical statement. (In response to the question “Why do you play such strange chords, Mr. Monk?” he once told a disc jockey, “Those easy chords are hard to find nowadays.”) It was always assumed that he could be found in some dark back room, a remote, if not imaginary, figure, like the Pied Piper of Hamelin.

    But all the while, oblivious to the smell of boiling cabbage in the corridor, he has remained on West 63rd Street, a sentimental man with kind eyes and a full beard, playing his blunt and angular jazz on the grand piano in his kitchen.

  7. The Next Big Idea for the Next Decade →

    An interesting pointer to the idea that by focus on ‘resilience’, we may have a charter that guides us to success in addressing many of the man-made ills that preoccupy technologists, strategists and those with a sense of responsibility for our societal actions.

    We can’t continue to delude ourselves that things will get back to “normal” someday. They won’t. It’s a losing game to continue to devote our resources to recovering from disasters that, by now, we should know to expect.

  8. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and the Theory and Practice of Jihad →

    Perceptive analysis of a horrifying and, unfortunately, pretty competent psychopath. I’m caught up short by the statement that he “… recognizes no difference between fighting, governing, and religion.”

    Like the prophet Mohammed from whom he claims descent, al-Baghdadi sees himself as a soldier-Imam and recognizes no difference between fighting, governing, and religion. This allows him to flow seamlessly between mediums. If we write him off as a mere terrorist, we make the mistake of underestimating him. He is generally considered to be a crackpot by serious Islamic scholars, but he controls a tract of land that includes most of al-Anbar province, much of eastern Syria, and Iraq’s second largest city; that makes him a serious player in the region. However, we should also beware of making him out to be ten feet tall. If we are going to deal with him, we need to understand how he fights and governs as well as his strengths and weaknesses.

  9. edgeperspectives:

The End of the Internet?
What irony! Government was the catalyst for the Internet and now it may be the catalyst for its demise as it evolves into Splinternet

To lay the blame for balkanization of the internet solely at the doorstep of ‘government’ seems facile and disingenuous.  As pointed out in the article: 

Laura DeNardis, a scholar of Internet governance at American University, argues that the Internet’s character is inherently commercial and private today. “The Internet is a collection of independent systems,” she writes, “operated by mostly private companies,” including large telecommunications providers like AT&T and giant content companies such as Google and Facebook. All of these players make the Internet function through private economic agreements governing the transmission of data among their respective networks.

By throwing in a large measure of governmental imperative to regulate (…or, as often described, ‘protect’…) and to do so in ways that are not in harmony with neighbors and other communicants, definitely adds to the friction and fractious nature of today’s internet.  The governmental meddling and fiddling needs to be replaced by informed decisions and lawmaking … no doubt about it.  But,… owning the problem is not one that is government’s alone.

    edgeperspectives:

    The End of the Internet?

    What irony! Government was the catalyst for the Internet and now it may be the catalyst for its demise as it evolves into Splinternet

    To lay the blame for balkanization of the internet solely at the doorstep of ‘government’ seems facile and disingenuous.  As pointed out in the article: 

    Laura DeNardis, a scholar of Internet governance at American University, argues that the Internet’s character is inherently commercial and private today. “The Internet is a collection of independent systems,” she writes, “operated by mostly private companies,” including large telecommunications providers like AT&T and giant content companies such as Google and Facebook. All of these players make the Internet function through private economic agreements governing the transmission of data among their respective networks.

    By throwing in a large measure of governmental imperative to regulate (…or, as often described, ‘protect’…) and to do so in ways that are not in harmony with neighbors and other communicants, definitely adds to the friction and fractious nature of today’s internet.  The governmental meddling and fiddling needs to be replaced by informed decisions and lawmaking … no doubt about it.  But,… owning the problem is not one that is government’s alone.

  10. Computational Linguistics of Twitter Reveals the Existence of Global Superdialects | MIT Technology Review →

    The results reveal a major surprise about the way dialects are distributed around the world and provide a fascinating snapshot of how they are evolving under various new pressures, such as global communication mechanisms like Twitter.